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A 26-year-old South African cagefighter knocked his opponent out with a masterful front kick, then celebrated by pretending to shoot him in the face

A 26-year-old South African cagefighter knocked his opponent out with a masterful front kick, then celebrated by pretending to shoot him in the face

Asiashu Tshitamba, a South African cagefighter, brilliantly knocked out Billy Oosthuizen at EFC 81 on Saturday to earn his fourth straight win in the competition. The 26-year-old caused a stir with his celebration, however, when he simulated shooting his already downed opponent in the head. Extreme Fighting Championship’s vice president of talent, Graeme Cartmell, told Business Insider that Tshitamba is free to celebrate how he wants and that the gesture might not have been meant as what EFC fans on Twitter have taken it to mean. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories . Asiashu Tshitamba, a 26-year-old South African cagefighter, produced a stunning knockout at EFC 81 but caused controversy with his celebration when he pretended to shoot his downed opponent in the head. Tshitamba faced Billy “The Kid” Oosthuizen in Pretoria on Saturday night and made light work of his fellow South African, knocking him out just 10 seconds into the second round with a perfectly executed front kick to the chin. The bantamweight duel ended in contentious fashion, however, as Tshitamba stood over Oosthuizen and simulated two gunshots to the head. You can watch the knockout and celebration here: Fans of the Extreme Fighting Championship on Twitter described Tshitamba’s celebration as “a little too much” and disrespectful . However, Graeme Cartmell, the EFC’s vice president of talent, told Business Insider that it’s down to the fighters to choose how to celebrate a victory. “I’ve got to be honest with you: We take a stance that these guys are presenting their own images,” Cartmell said. “And whatever they do will ultimately encourage fans to garner them in high regard or see them in the way a few people have seen them on Twitter. “Fifty percent of the room are going to go ‘That was awesome’ and take it like a cowboy reference to Billy the Kid, and others will say it’s not the way to do it.” Cartmell added: “I certainly wouldn’t condone it from that perspective, but if that’s how he celebrates, that what he’s chosen to do.” Read more: Conor McGregor said he’s a billionaire in an Instagram post, but it’s unlikely that’s even close to being true Tshitamba recorded his fourth victory on the bounce in the EFC to take his record in the competition to 4-1. After the fight, Tshitamba called for a title shot against the interim bantamweight title-holder, Faeez Jacobs — who beat Nkazimulo Zulu on Saturday to claim the belt — but Cartmell said the knockout merchant must wait his turn. “Right now, no, but it now puts in position for a contender fight,” he said. EFC 82 is set for September 28 at the Big Top Arena at Carnival City in Johannesburg.

A 26-year-old South African cagefighter knocked his opponent out with a masterful front kick, then celebrated by pretending to shoot him in the face

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Judge Arthur Burnett SR Inducted Into IAOTP’s Hall of Fame

Judge Arthur Burnett SR Inducted Into IAOTP’s Hall of Fame

United States, District of Columbia, Washington – 08-15-2019 (PRDistribution.com) — The Honorable Arthur L. Burnett, SR, Retired Judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, Former Vice President of Administration, National Executive Director and National Spokesperson for the National African American Drug Policy Coalition Inc. was just recently inducted into the International Association of Top Professionals (IAOTP), Hall of Fame for 2019. While inclusion with the International Association of Top Professionals is an honor in itself, only 10 honored IAOTP members are inducted into the exclusive IAOTP’s Hall of Fame. These special honorees are distinguished based on their longevity in their fields, their contributions they have made to society and the impact they had on their industries. Judge Burnett will be honored at IAOTP’s annual awards gala at the end of this year in Las Vegas for not only this award but also for his selection for the Lifetime Achievement Award by IAOTP. www.iaotp.com/award-gala Judge Burnett was honored at the 2017 IAOTP’s Annual Awards Gala, at the Ritz Carlton in Battery Park NYC for being selected as “Top Judge of the Year for 2017″ and he will be honored for this distinction at their 2019 Annual Awards Gala being held at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, for this distinction along with his selection for the Lifetime Achievement Award. Stephanie Cirami, President of IAOTP stated “Choosing Judge Burnett for this award was an easy decision for our panel to make. He is brilliant, extraordinary, and an inspiration to all professionals in all industries. Judge Burnett is in a class of his own and we are honored to have him inducted into our Hall of Fame. All honorees are invited to attend the IAOTP’s annual award gala at the end of this year for a night to honor their achievements. www.iaotp.com/award-gala . Judge Burnett is being recognized for having over 6 decades of professional experience in the Legal Field and for demonstrating success not only within the Judicial System but has impacted society on a global level. He has visited and consulted with judges from foreign countries and served as a briefing judge for the U.S. Department of State in advising foreign judges on the operations of the legal and judicial system of the United States. Mr. Burnett commenced his legal career after graduating from Howard University summa cum laude with a major in political science and minor in economics. In his junior year he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and attended New York University School of Law in a six-year college-law combination program, receiving his college degree in October 1957 and receiving his law degree in June 1958 from New York University, graduating in the top 10% of his class and as a Founders’ Day Award Recipient. Mr. Burnett completed 7 years of college and law school work in only 6 calendar years. He was also Associate Research Editor of its Law Review. Mr. Burnett began in the Attorney General’s Honors Program at the United States Department of Justice in the Criminal Division in June 1958 but was shortly thereafter drafted into the United States Army November 18, 1958 while endeavoring to obtain a Judge Advocate General’s Corps Commission in the United States Air Force, having passed the Bar of the District of Columbia October 20, 1958. He became a Second Lieutenant in the Adjutant General Corps and received the Army Commendation Medal from the Secretary of U.S. Army for his exceptional performance of duty. He continued to serve in the Ready Reserve and was promoted to First Lieutenant and finally resigned his Commission when he was appointed United States Magistrate in June 1969. In civilian life in December 1960 he returned to the U.S. Department of Justice and in January 1961 became liaison from the Criminal Division to the Attorney General of the United States to keep him and the Deputy Attorney General advised of significant developments in all the major criminal cases and also to monitor the Martin Luther King Civil Rights Movement. He was also appointed by the Attorney General as Special Prosecutor with the United States Attorney of Maryland of two United States Congressmen for government corruption offenses with reference to their activities to persuade the Attorney General and the Administration to prevent the prosecution of a Savings and Loan entrepreneur and his general counsel running two Savings and Loan Association for perpetrating frauds against senior citizens and gullible investors. The two congressmen and the Proprietor of the two Savings and Loans were convicted after a trial lasting almost three (3) months on every count in the indictment. He played a major role in convincing the Attorney General and the President that they had to go forward with criminal prosecution or the Kennedy Administration could face a Teapot Dome Scandal or what we now frequently refer to a Watergate Scandal. In April 1965 he became an Assistant United States Attorney in Washington, District of Columbia serving as a Senior Prosecutor and in December 1968 he became the first General Counsel – then called Legal Advisor – of the Metropolitan Police Department in the District of Columbia. His role was to prepare the General Orders and give advice to the Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department and senior officers and supervisors to prevent civil rights violations and police brutality claims and to make sure that the police officers complied with the requirements of decisions of the United States federal courts under the United States Constitution after the riots and destructions which had occurred in Washington, D.C. following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 3, 1968 and in a sense to be the Squad Car Lawyer inside the Police Department restore peace and order and to assure that the police would not retaliate against the Black citizens of the Nation’s Capital during that period. He had planned to spend 3-5 years in that role, but less than a year after taking on that job and professional responsibilities, he was appointed on June 26, 1969 at 34 years of age to the Judicial System as the first African American United States Magistrate in the Nation. He served in that position for six (6) years leaving the judicial systems after leading reform efforts at this stage of the judicial system in December 1975. Those reforms included strengthening the quality of arrest and search warrants issued by federal magistrates, implement Bail Reform processes so that persons were not kept in jail on low money bonds because of poverty, but on issues of likeli hood of flight and failure to comply with court appearances in the past and strength of the government’s case and finally that defense lawyers could call witnesses at a preliminary hearing to show weaknesses in the government’s case such as homicides where there was plausible evidence of self defense, or in a rape case of prostitution and disputes over consent and money being paid for sex, or a narcotics undercover officers fabricate their reports of undercover buys of drugs from persons who did not match the description in the written report. This initiative led to a lengthy Court of Appeals decision which was later adopted by the Judicial Conference to be binding on all of the Federal Courts of this Nation. In December 1975 he faced the most difficult professional decision he had to make in his career. He was recruited to leave the Bench although he had two more years to go on his Term as United States Magistrate and to become Assistant General Counsel, in charge of the Legal Advisory Division of the then United States Civil Service Commisson to act on harmonizing affirmative action and the merit systems as if he were a United States federal district court judge to issue opinions which would stand up in the United States Supreme Court. In addition he had four children approaching the ages of entering college. His colleagues urging that he was only 40 could return to the Bench later. He resigned as a Magistrate and took the job. Subsequently, President Jimmy Carter established as his major initiative revising the Federal Civil System and he was assigned to work with the White House Counsel’s Office and served as a principal legal advisor and was the principal drafter of the legislation which became the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 leading to the creation of Office of Personnel Management, the Merit Systems Protection Board, the Federal Labor Relations Authority and the Office of Special Counsel to deal with Hatch Act allegations. He also drafted the provisions which led to and refined recommendations from others to create the Senior Executive Service. He also advised President Carter on the several reorganizations plans during his Term as President. Ironically, during this period of time, he was very active in the Federal Bar Association, of present and former federal government lawyers, and when Congress was considering giving Magistrates the power to try civil cases with the consent of the parties, the Justice Department under then Attorney General Griffin Bell, supported the concept but would qualify it to permit the losing party to have a de novo trial before a district Court judge. He appeared as a former Magistrate and a Member of the Federal Bar Committee dealing with the role of United States Magistrates, in opposition to the provision for de novo trials before district court judges, urging that such a requirement would impose double costs for a trial on litigants, second consent of the parties and lawyers would be required influencing magistrates to be careful and thorough in their rulings and decisions to continue to persuade the lawyers at the Bar to give consent, third magistrates were selected by the Judges for 8-year terms, and judges normally pick magistrates like they pick their own law clerks as the best intellectual talent they can find, and many magistrates will perform in a manner to persuade those persons who play a role in selecting individuals as lifetime judges to elevate them to higher judicial office. The Congress rejected Attorney General Griffin Bell’s position and accepted the approach he advocated and now Magistrate Judges throughout this Nation can set as Substitute District Court Judges in all civil cases with direct appeals to the United States Court of Appeals. Indeed, upon return to the Federal Bench as a Magistrate later shortly thereafter Congress enhanced the stature to call these officials “Magistrate Judges” and after returning to the United States District Court in January, 1980, in Calendar Year 1985 he tried thirteen (13) civil cases sitting as a substitute district judge with direct appeal to the United States Court of Appeals. . In January 1980 he was again appointed to an 8-year term as United States Magistrate (now called United States Magistrate Judges) in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, where he served until appointed by President Ronald Reagan to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia in November 1987, a court which has both jurisdiction over federal cases and state type cases. He retired in October 1998 from active Associate Judge status and became a Senior Judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and continued to serve actively hearing cases until August 1, 2004. During this period Mr. Burnett also served as Judge-in-Residence to the Children’s Defense Fund and as Co-Chair of its Judges’ program in the Children’s Defense Fund where he advised on proposed legislation, ran seminars and conferences at the Alex Haley Farm retreat in Tennessee, and was a speaker or on panels. While retaining the status of a Senior Judge, on August 1, 2004 he took a Sabbatical from the Bench and assumed the position of National Executive Director of The National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc. in which position he now serves. He served as an Adjunct Law Professor in Trial Advocacy at Howard University School of Law from 1998 – 2011. He also has served as an Adjunct Law Professor at the Columbus School of Law, Catholic University, from 1997 to 2008. On February 15, 2013 he officially completely retired from the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Throughout his illustrious career, Mr. Burnett has received numerous awards and has been recognized worldwide for his outstanding leadership and commitment to the profession. In 1963 while Arthur was working as an Adviser directly to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, he received the Sustained Superior Performance Award for his work in keeping the Attorney General advised of developments in major government corruption cases and in monitoring the Martin Luther King Civil Rights Movement. In December 1978 he was awarded the Distinguished Civil Service Award for his work in advising the old U.S. Civil Service Commission and the President of the United States in securing the passage of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978. In 1985 he was recognized by the American Bar Association’s National Conference of Special Court Judges as the Most Outstanding Special Court Judge in America for his leadership role as one of the United States Magistrates in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia for his work in upgrading the old U.S. Commissioner system and leadership in converting the United States Magistrate system into the misdemeanor trial court in the federal system, giving real substance to preliminary hearings, reforming the arrest and search warrant operations and his leadership in education of Magistrate Judges and influencing legislative developments. In 1999 he was recognized as being one of the three (3) Most Outstanding General Jurisdiction Judges hearing all types of cases in America by the American Bar Association’s National Conference of State Trial Court Judges for his judicial performance on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. In 2005 he was awarded the ABA Commission on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Profession Spirit of Excellence Award for his civil rights history and judicial performance, one of the highest and most prestigious Awards given by the American Bar Association. In 2009 he was acknowledged as a WAYMAKER in the American Bar Association Judges’ Journal for his civil rights history and judicial performance in an extensive interview of his life’s history. Finally, in 2010 he was recognized by Cambridge’s Who’s Who as one of the most knowledgeable experts in the United States on the drug laws and policies of this Nation and the application of the criminal and juvenile justice system and related healthcare issues involving treatment for substance use disorders and mental health conditions. In 2017 he was recognized by Who’s Who with the Life Time Achievement Award named after the founder of Who’s Who – Albert Nelson Marquis, and also in 2017 he was honored by the International Association of Top Professionals as the Top Judge of 2017. For 2018 he was featured in TIP Magazine and selected for IAOTP’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Now retired, Mr. Burnett continues to serve as the National Executive Director of the National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc. and as an officer in several other non-profit entities, on their Board of Directors, or as an Advisor to such organizations dealing with youth, substance abuse, mental health and juvenile and criminal justice reforms. He was recently reappointed by the Mayor of the District of Columbia to a part-time position as a Member of the District of Columbia Commission on Fathers, Men and Boys to a Term ending in September 2020. For more information on Judge Burnett please visit: https://ballotpedia.org/Arthur_Burnett_Sr. Watch his video: About IAOTP The International Association of Top Professionals (IAOTP) is an international boutique networking organization who handpicks the world’s finest, most prestigious top professionals from different industries. These top professionals are given an opportunity to collaborate, share their ideas, be keynote speakers and to help influence others in their fields. This organization is not a membership that anyone can join. You have to be asked by the President or be nominated by a distinguished honorary member after a brief interview. IAOTP’s experts have given thousands of top prestigious professionals around the world, the recognition and credibility that they deserve and have helped in building their branding empires. IAOTP prides itself to be a one of a kind boutique networking organization that hand picks only the best of the best and creates a networking platform that connects and brings these top professionals to one place. For more information on IAOTP please visit: www.iaotp.com Media Contacts: Company Name: iaotp Full Name: Stephanie Cirami Phone: 2126344427 Email Address: Send Email Website: www.iaotp.com For the original news story, please visit https://prdistribution.com/news/judge-arthur-burnett-sr-inducted-into-iaotps-hall-of-fame.html. Powered by WPeMatico

Judge Arthur Burnett SR Inducted Into IAOTP’s Hall of Fame

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Famous South African artist and designer, Carrol Boyes, dies at 65

Famous South African artist and designer, Carrol Boyes, dies at 65

Renowned South African artist and designer, Carrol Boyes, has died. Famous iconic artist and designer, Carrol Boyes, has died. She was 65 years old. In a statement issued by the Carrol Boyes (Pty) Ltd on Thursday, the company confirmed Boyes’s death. “We are saddened by the loss of Carrol, who passed away last night after a brief illness,” the company said in a statement. Carrol Boyes was the founder, creator and chief executive of The Carrol Boyes (Pty) Ltd retailer in Cape Town. “She was an iconic South African artist and designer and her creativity has deftly crafted a coveted and high-end product range of upmarket home and lifestyle items. “Carrol demonstrated the very highest values in her business; integrity, playful perspectives and passion for design and for her staff. Her personal touch will inspire and stay with us always,” the company said. Boyes, the company said, had enriched many lives in many ways, including instilling an unconventional approach to business “and her message to her staff was ‘I have had such fun with you and you have enriched my life greatly. Please remember that we do things differently here. Never be ordinary – be extraordinary and throw in a bit of naughtiness every now and then and keep laughing. Never lose your sense of humour’.” The company said Boyes would be remembered for her love, her story and her quirky creativity. “Carrol leaves our nation with a legacy of excellence, unity, empowerment and pioneering functional art. She will be greatly missed.” Boyes began her working life as a high school English teacher, and only gradually moved into making a living from her first love, sculpture. She established her company in 1991. She built her business from a one-woman show run from her Hout Bay studio and supplying a single gift shop in Cape Town, to one that now provides jobs for several hundred people and has outlets all over the world. Her first products were distressed copper candlesticks and pewter cutlery, with handles sculpted into naked bodies, fish tails or flowing abstract designs. The pewter cutlery is still a big seller today, popular for wedding gifts, she says, but the single most popular item is a water jug with the handle in the lean form of a stretching man.

Famous South African artist and designer, Carrol Boyes, dies at 65

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Fun for the whole family at the South African Book Fair 2019

Fun for the whole family at the South African Book Fair 2019

The 2019 South African Book Fair is jam-packed with activities that combine fun with a deeply enriching experience, making it the perfect day out for families. Taking place from September 6 to 8 at Constitution Hill in Johannesburg, experts in learning and teaching materials will be on hand to share their insights with parents, guardians and children on what books to read for learning and fun. Among the many family highlights is Stories of Africa, a multi-lingual storytelling by activist and poet Gcina Mhlophe, whose traditional tales of Africa deepen our understanding of history and encourage children to read. Also not to be missed is the acclaimed Dance of the Dung Beetles , which sees scientist Marcus Byrne and writer Helen Lunn bring to life the mysterious lives of the creatures through 3,000 years of history and mythology. Free performances take place in the National Book Week Magic Tent. From toddlers to grandparents, all are welcome to join in a celebration of the affirmative power of books and reading that includes: An appearance by The Gruffalo and a multilingual reading of Julia Donaldson’s engaging story. Illustrator Toby Newsome entertaining the young ones with Gogo’s List , the acclaimed Ghanaian children’s book. isiZulu storyteller Zanele Ndlovu bringing ancient tales to life through uMakhwenyana accompanied by the strings of her indigenous musical instruments. Yes Yanga! coming to life through a spirited sharing by the much-adored Refiloe Moahloli of her latest children’s book, in English, isiXhosa and isiZulu. Appearances by Funda Bala, our delightful National Book Week reading promotion mascot. The National Book Week’s Magic Tent: SABF 2018. An exciting focus on the role of visual storytelling can be experienced in multiple ways at the fair: The ongoing Illustrator’s Exhibition, which features the work of children’s book illustrators Mogau Kekana and Toby Newsome, and comic book illustrators Loyiso Mkize, Clyde Beech and Nathi Ngubane. Find Your SA Art Heroes: Renowned art expert Dr Cobi Labuscagne and designer Lauren Mulligan take youngsters on a journey of discovery through the world of contemporary South African art and artists, featuring the works of Mary Sibande, Zander Blom, Banele Khoza, Billie Zangewa and many more. Ready, Steady, DRAW! Children’s book illustrators Mogau Kekana, Toby Newsome and Qaps Mngadi, and comic book illustrators Nathi Ngubane, Loyiso Mkize and Clyde Beech demonstrate their skills in a live drawing session. Although schools are prioritised, there are a limited number of tickets available for parents and children to attend the fair’s dedicated Schools’ Programme. This full day of storytelling, talks and workshops for pupils and educators on September 6 focuses on nurturing a love of books and reading. Highlights include a superhero drawing session with award-winning author Sifiso Mzobe. With plenty to eat and drink, easily accessible parking, public transport and more than 100 authors, poets, storytellers, creators and expert facilitators, the three-day event is not to be missed. Daily admission tickets cost just R10, with free entrance for children under 16. Giveaway! One lucky family can win four weekend access tickets to the SA Book Fair and four session tickets, with a number of kids’ books (valued at R500) as an added bonus. Entry details: Step 2: Create a tweet, Instagram or Facebook post sharing the reason(s) you read. (The post will essentially read “I #readbecause…”) Step 3: Include the hashtag #SABF2019 in your tweet and/or post and voila, you’ve entered! Entries close on August 23. Happy sharing!

Fun for the whole family at the South African Book Fair 2019

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South African artist and designer Carrol Boyes dies

South African artist and designer Carrol Boyes dies

South African artist and designer Carrol Boyes dies 2019-08-15 11:40 share this Carrol Boyes (Photo: Supplied) Related Links PICS: Miss Universe Catriona Gray goes on her first ever safari while in South Africa Basetsana Kumalo on writing her memoir: ‘It is the most important project of my life’ PICS: Miss SA Zozibini Tunzi moves into her new R5m home Cape Town – South African artist Carrol Boyes died on Wednesday after a brief illness. She was 65. Carrol was the founder, creator and CEO of The Carrol Boyes retailer in Cape Town. Company spokesperson Michelé Stuurman confirmed the tragic news, saying: “Carrol will be remembered for her love, her story and her quirky creativity.” “Carrol leaves our nation with a legacy of excellence, unity, empowerment and pioneering functional art. She will be greatly missed,” she added. About Carrol’s legacy, Michelé told Channel24 : “Carrol demonstrated the very highest values in her business; integrity, playful perspectives and passion for design and for her staff. Her personal touch will inspire and stay with us always.” LEARN MORE ABOUT CARROL HERE: share this Read more on: carrol boyes celebrity death local celebrities

South African artist and designer Carrol Boyes dies

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Acclaimed South African artist Carrol Boyes dies

Acclaimed South African artist Carrol Boyes dies

Image via Twitter: @CarrolBoyes A company spokesperson for Carrol Boyes SA, the brand, confirmed that the acclaimed artist and designer passed away on Wednesday night. The cause of death has not yet been confirmed; however, a media statement will be released in due course. As reported by Channel 24, Boyes passed away after a brief illness. Carrol Boyes SA spokesperson, Michele Stuurman, told the outlet that “Carrol will be remembered for her love, her story and her quirky creativity.” More to follow . Who was Carrol Boyes? Boyes founded the Cape-Town based brand – Carrol Boyes SA – in 1991. Over the years, she has “deftly crafted a coveted and high-end product range of upmarket home and lifestyle items.” Boyes was a fine arts graduate with a major in sculpting from the University of Pretoria. Prior to that, she was an English teacher, but decided at the age of 35 to live her dream of being an artist. Watch: An interview with Boyes, dated 2013

Acclaimed South African artist Carrol Boyes dies

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North African-inspired house built for Elijah Muhammad’s daughter sells

North African-inspired house built for Elijah Muhammad’s daughter sells

One of four North African-inspired houses in Kenwood built in the early 1970s to house family members of Nation of Islam founder Elijah Muhammad sold Tuesday. Selling for $1.1 million, the six-bedroom, 4,400-square-foot house on 49th Street has a two-story central atrium with skylights above, “like the houses built around courtyards in North Africa,” said Sliman Bensmaia, who bought the house with his wife, Kerry Ledoux. Both are University of Chicago faculty. “I’m so pumped about it,” Bensmaia said, “because my father was Algerian—I lived in Algeria until I was about 2—and this house is like houses that some of my relatives had” in North Africa. He said that he and Ledoux had been living in a condominium and not actively house-hunting when the house came on the market in late March, but “we took a look and it has all these arches inside and tile. It’s a modern house with a North African twist.” Built on a double lot in 1973, the home has a tall panel of stained glass in a Moorish pattern above the front door, but its blond brick exterior otherwise “doesn’t look exotic until you go inside,” said Joanne Bullen, the Ultimate Realty Group agent who represented Bensmaia and Ledoux. Inside, she said, a diamond-patterned wood ceiling hangs above the living room, arched doorways and windows, and African-patterned tile in the bathrooms “are so different from most houses.” In the early 1970s, Elijah Muhammad commissioned Egyptian architect M. Momen to design five houses, one for him and four in a row across the street for his children and aides. Cook County property records indicate this home, on the corner of 49th and Woodlawn Avenue, was owned by Muhammad’s daughter Ethel Muhammad Sharrieff, and after her death in 2002, by two of her daughters until 2009, when they turned over the deed to a lender that had begun foreclosure proceedings, according to the Cook County recorder of deeds. Elijah Muhammad’s house, on the east side of Woodlawn, is now owned by Louis Farrakhan, the current head of the Nation of Islam. Of the four houses on the west side of Woodlawn, the one that Bensmaia and Ledoux bought “seems to be the closest to its original condition,” said Jessie Pinkham, the Ultimate Realty Group agent who represented the sellers. “Some of the others have been gutted inside.” The sellers, identified in county property records as Isabel Bichao and Jorge Parada, bought the house from the foreclosing lender in 2010 for $510,000. At the time, the skylights leaked and many of the floors were damaged, Pinkham said, and the couple “restored it all carefully,” trying to preserve the original look as designed by Momen. They put it on the market in late March, asking a little less than $1.2 million, and had a contract with the buyers in early June. The sale closed Tuesday. An earlier version of this article reported an incorrect day for this week’s sale.

North African-inspired house built for Elijah Muhammad’s daughter sells

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Félix Fénéon – critic, collector, and champion of African art

Félix Fénéon – critic, collector, and champion of African art

Opus 217. Against the Enamel of a Background Rhythmic with Beats and Angles, Tones and Tints, Portrait of M. Félix Fénéon in 1890 (1890, detail), Paul Signac. Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Paige Knight. Félix Fénéon (1861–1944) preferred what he described as ‘indirect occupations’. By the age of 25 he had written Les Impressionnistes en 1886 – the definitive art-critical text of the decade, which made the case for Georges Seurat as the first of the ‘neo-Impressionists’ (Fénéon’s coinage) – but he never put out another book under his own name. He devoted his efforts instead to encouraging the voices of others: he prepared Rimbaud’s Illuminations for publication, and in a series of short-lived reviews in the mid 1880s he published poets such as Stéphane Mallarmé and Jules Laforgue, for which he was nicknamed the ‘midwife of Symbolism’. Félix Fénéon (1901), Maximilien Luce. Photo: RMN-Grand Palais (Musée d’Orsay) In the spring of 1894, it was almost certainly Fénéon who detonated a bomb at the fashionable Foyot restaurant, wounding four people. He charmed his way out of being convicted (‘I only throw literary bombs,’ he explained to the jury); the scandal cost him his job as clerk at the French War Office, where, while he was making frequent anonymous contributions to anarchist journals, he had been a model employee for some 13 years. Between 1896 and 1903 he was a sub-editor at the Revue Blanche ; a portrait by Félix Vallotton from these years depicts him leaning over his desk, back poker-straight, correcting a stack of proofs. Imposingly tall, with a fine blonde goatee, Fénéon cut a dandyish, even diabolical figure through Paris. Guillaume Apollinaire called him ‘the false Yankee of the rue de Richeville’, while Paul Valéry remembered him as ‘just, pitiless, and gentle’. What we know of Fénéon’s personality is almost entirely composed of such fragments; he consistently refused all recognition for his own labours. When a publisher approached Fénéon with a view to putting out a collection of his writings, he was rebuffed with the reply: ‘I aspire only to silence.’ Antelope mask (19th century/early 20th century), Guro, Ivory Coast. Photo: © RMN-Grand Palais/The Trustees of the British Museum Perhaps in none of his guises did Fénéon succeed in this aspiration more completely than as a collector of African art. He amassed one of the more significant African collections of the first half of the 20th century, augmented by a few sculptures from Oceania and a single Native American bowl: 457 objects, all told. Around a quarter of these have been reunited in Paris at the Musée du Quai-Branly (until 28 September), before another exhibition at the Orangerie (16 October–27 January 2020) about Fénéon’s involvement with modern painting, from his championing of the neo-Impressionists to his role as a director of Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, where in 1912 he became the first to arrange an exhibition of the Italian Futurists in Paris (16 October–27 January 2020; a distillation of both exhibitions travels to MoMA in New York next year, 22 March–25 July 2020). However, Fénéon never wrote a word about why, or when, he developed an interest in African art. Amulet with mask (19th/early 20th century), Loango, Democratic Republic of Congo. Musée d’Art Moderne, Troyes. Photo: © Carole Bell/Ville de Troyes Jean Laude, a historian of African art, believed that Fénéon may have bought his first African objects in 1904. This would place him among the first of the artists and aesthetes in Paris who began to look at the wooden artefacts brought back from the colonies neither as exotic curios, nor as objects solely for ethnographic study, but as artworks in their own right. It was not until 1907 that Picasso had his famous encounter at the Trocadéro museum with the masks of the Gabonese Fang people, the form of which he borrowed for the two women at the right of Les Demoiselles d’Avignon that year. Fénéon’s verdict on what is broadly acknowledged as the first work of Western Primitivism: ‘You should stick to caricature.’ But whether Fénéon understood the African resemblance in Les Demoiselles – whether he was taking issue with Picasso’s distortion of the human figure, or with his pastiche of African aesthetics – is impossible to say. Unlike Laude, Fénéon’s biographer Joan Ungersma Halperin believes that he did not begin collecting African works until 1919. By this time, through the work of writers such as Paul Guillaume, Henri Clouzot and André Level – all influenced by Carl Einstein’s Negerplastik (1915), which questioned the racial essentialism of earlier accounts – the debate in Paris regarding the status of African art had matured from the first flush of aesthetic discovery into more scholarly discussions. Some of the theories now seem outlandish, but they arose from conviction that a sculptural language that could abbreviate figures to the simplest volumetric shapes and features to a few elegant lines merited a new place for African art and thought in accounts of world culture. Writing in the foreword to Guillaume’s Sculptures nègres (1917), the first French book on the subject, Apollinaire argued that perhaps African sculpture, which was then believed to have remained in much the same form for thousands of years, had influenced the ancient Egyptians, and could therefore be considered as the foundation stone upon which the Western canon had been raised. Mask (19th/early 20th century), Guro, Ivory Coast. Musée d’Art Moderne, Troyes. Photo: © Carole Bell/Ville de Troyes Fénéon’s entry into this debate was both characteristically indirect and emphatic. Beginning in November of 1920, he devoted three issues of his magazine Le Bulletin de la Vie Artistique to a survey in which he asked 20 artists, critics, ethnographers and colonial officers to respond to the question: ‘Will art from remote places be admitted to the Louvre?’ The pun in the title – les arts lointains can also be translated as ‘far-reaching arts’ – offered an elegant and original solution to the problem of what to call arts from societies as diverse and geographically distant as those of Africa, Native America, and Oceania, which had previously been lumped together as either ‘Negro’, ‘primitive’, or ‘savage’ art. But beyond this, Fénéon’s editorial contribution was slight. He simply provided the platform. Respondents include the painter Lucie Cousturier, who had taught literacy to Senegalese immigrants to France. She writes that ‘when […] the Louvre admits Negro art it will find not its complement but its essence’. Others, such as Colonel Grossin, who describes ‘what I’ve seen among these backward peoples’, were given the opportunity to dig a hole for themselves. Falling between these two poles, many of Fénéon’s respondents sound a note of cautious deferral, expressed most clearly by Guillaume: ‘We should not forget that there currently exists no elite with the expertise to pick out those works whose meaning and authenticity make them worthy of permanent consecration.’ Loom pulley (19th/early 20th century), Guro, Ivory Coast. Photo: © RMN-Grand Palais/The Trustees of the British Museum Further pieces on les arts lointains would appear in Fénéon’s Bulletin , including Cousturier’s dispatches from West Africa, a review of Clouzot and Level’s Sculptures africaines et océannienes (1925), and an anonymous piece (perhaps by Fénéon himself?) that notes, with delighted irony, the reversal by which Paris appeared to have been colonised by African culture. To illustrate several of these articles, Fénéon began to include photographs of works in his own collection: a snouted, many-toothed Baule helmet mask appears in the pages of the comic piece, while a Kuyu statue with ornate geometric scarifications, now in the British Museum, adorns Janneau’s review. The works are never mentioned directly in the text, but the captions are always meticulous – including geographical provenance, materials, colours, height, often even weight – reflecting a lifelong dedication to details. (Some of Fénéon’s book reviews consisted of the number of pages, number and size of illustrations, weight of the manuscript, and so on.) Fénéon also began to lend his works to a number of exhibitions; most significantly, he gave 70 pieces to ‘L’Art indigène des colonies françaises et du Congo belge’, a blockbuster of more than 400 works that took place at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in 1923. He contributed works to the Surrealist-organised ‘Contre-Exposition Coloniale’ in 1931, and in 1935, he gave 11 works to ‘African Negro Art’, the first survey of its kind in the United States. Among them were a Fang portrait bust, an equestrian Yoruba figure, and a double-faced Luba helmet mask. Each was photographed by Walker Evans, and reproduced as a print. Double-headed helmet mask (19th/early 20th century), Luba, Democratic Republic of Congo. Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Photo: Eric Emo; © Musée d’Art Moderne/Roger Viollet. Restricting his commentary to the bare minimum of fact, while making sure that they were seen in the right places, Fénéon allowed the works in his collection to speak for themselves. In this, the exhibition at the Quai Branly follows his lead. Displays of archival documents explore Fénéon’s contribution as an editor to debates about African and Oceanic art, but in terms of the collection itself, none of the wall texts explain the functions or meanings of the objects with respect to the societies from which they came – information we have come to expect in ethnographic museums. Instead they point out the regions in which Fénéon showed the greatest interest – the Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea and Congo. Notwithstanding a few large masks and some imposing statues – in particular, the famous Fang Mabea statue, which after Fénéon’s death was bought by Jacques Kerchache – what is striking about the collection is the preponderance of pieces that can fit in the hand. From Congo and Gabon come predominantly small, votive figures of men and women, including a statue from the Kongo region of a mother, with a cylindrical headdress and skin adorned with intricate scarifications, suckling an infant. There is a group of small amulets from the Congolese Loango peoples, taking the forms of faces, figures, and a monkey’s hand, and there are several cups, carved in the shape of heads, from the Kuba kingdom of Congo. Statue of a woman (19th century), Fang Mabea, Cameroon. He had a particular passion for Ivorian bobbins – exquisitely carved wooden objects, each surmounted with a sleek, stylised head, that were used in the Guro, Bete and Baule regions of the country to operate the heddles of a loom. Fénéon lent 31 of these pieces to the 1923 exhibition at MAD; Clouzot and Level remarked in Sculptures africaines et océannienes that they were the favourite exhibit of the visiting public. One of the heads takes an abstracted, bird-like form, with the features subsumed into a graceful, arcing beak, but the majority evince the stylised naturalism for which Ivorian art has been especially celebrated in the West. Perhaps the most beautiful of the dozen or so at the Quai Branly is in the form of a woman’s head, on top of which a cup is perched. The incised decoration on the sleek, mildly patinated black wood is confined to just a few zigzags, indicating the coiffure, and two dipping curves for the eyes, accentuating the line of the profile: the pointed nose juts out to complete the elegant, rhythmic S-curve begun by the concave forehead, before sharply receding to the chin. Lorenz Homberger has recently identified this piece (now in the Musée Barbier-Mueller in Geneva) as the work of a Guro master carver from Bouaflé, who between around 1910 and 1930 produced a number of exquisite masks with the same features. Loom pulley (19th/early 20th century), Guro, Ivory Coast. Musée Barbier-Mueller, Geneva. Photo: Studio Ferrazini-Bouchet Fénéon stopped collecting in 1930, and around this time he began to catalogue the full collection – another example of his passion for categorising, and one which would prove invaluable for his friend, the dealer Charles Ratton, who prepared the sale of Fénéon’s collection at Hôtel Drouot in 1947. Fénéon’s catalogue entries are limited, for the most part, to objective notes on geographical provenance, material, and possible function, coupled with the most abbreviated descriptions – but at times he indulges in (short) flights of fancy. One of his loom pulleys, ‘sculpted with the head of a human, which might just as well be the head of a goat’, he describes as being ‘flanked by vast ears like dinner plates’. Another Guro piece is captioned: ‘Spoon which places between the fingers of the diner a woman with a fine, imperious head and curiously stylised figure.’ Loom pulley (19th century/early 20th century), Guro, Ivory Coast. Photo: © Claude Germain/Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac The entries in Fénéon’s catalogue are the closest thing we have to a personal pronouncement on the African artworks he owned. Philippe Peltier, co-curator of the exhibition, suggests that in their brevity and precision these notes can be compared to Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines – the mordant news items ( faits divers ) he wrote for Le Matin in 1906, which have become his most celebrated work among Anglophone readers. But the catalogue notes have none of the caustic irony of those miniature accounts of murders, suicides and state corruption. For me, their tone reflects the style of criticism Fénéon had pioneered in his youth, which with its delight in linguistic play – careful attention to sound; simple registers sprinkled with recondite scientific vocabulary – was intended to efface the identity of the critic, verbally mirroring the effect of a Symbolist poem or a pointillist painting. He describes a Sudanese animal mask: ‘Two dozen teeth in its hydrosaur’s throat’ ( Deux douzaines de dents dans sa gueule d’hydrosaurien – a wonderfully toothy sequence). Some of his descriptions dwell on the perceived eroticism of the artworks; of a sculpture of a woman by the Guinean Baga people, one of the few true masterpieces in his collection, he writes that ‘the forearms and hands, palms offered, lead like an avenue or funnel to the sexual ravine’. Elsewhere, he wonders of the female figure surmounting the ‘divine forehead’ of a Guro mask: ‘Why not Minerva?’ Perhaps, as Peltier notes, Fénéon had in mind Apollinaire’s theory about the influence of African aesthetics on Hellenistic Greece, by way of Egypt – but if so, he confined himself to raising the question. Even in his private notes, he reserved final judgement. Mask (19th/early 20th century) Guro, Ivory Coast. Photo: Vincent Girier Dufounier. Courtesy Charles-Wesley Houdré Nowhere in his notes does Fénéon compare the works in his collection and modernist painting. Of course, what this endlessly evasive figure does not say is just as significant as what he does. In his catalogue essay introducing ‘African Negro Sculpture’ in 1935, James Johnson Sweeney questioned whether African sculpture had made ‘any fundamental contribution’ to the art of ‘the last thirty years’, finding that ‘the early work of Picasso’ was more in the manner of ‘frank pastiches’ than ‘true assimilations’. Fénéon surely took pleasure from the African objects with which he surrounded himself, but I like to think that he found greater satisfaction from seeing these objects representing the rich cultures from which they had come. After Sweeney had visited Fénéon at his home in Paris to select objects for the exhibition, Fénéon sent him a note – a short one, naturally – thanking him for the ‘honour’ of being allowed to take part in an event of ‘such rare documentary and aesthetic importance’. Later, when the exhibition had concluded, Fénéon wrote again, politely requesting the swift return of his objects, while noting with gratitude: ‘You have given many of them the honour of a reproduction in the catalogue.’ Opus 217. Against the Enamel of a Background Rhythmic with Beats and Angles, Tones and Tints, Portrait of M. Félix Fénéon in 1890 (1890), Paul Signac. Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Paige Knight. ‘Félix Fénéon (1861–1944)’ is at the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, Paris, until 28 September. From the July/August 2019 issue of Apollo . Preview and subscribe here . There’s never been a better time to subscribe to Apollo magazine. 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Félix Fénéon – critic, collector, and champion of African art

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SA Post Office now accepting bank card payments for car licence renewals

SA Post Office now accepting bank card payments for car licence renewals

The South African Post Office said on Tuesday it would now accept debit and credit card payments, in addition to cash, for motor vehicle licence renewals at its branches offering the service. Picture: Leon Lestrade/African News Agency(ANA) JOHANNESBURG – The South African Post Office said on Tuesday it would now accept debit and credit card payments, in addition to cash, for motor vehicle licence renewals at its branches offering the service. SAPO’s Paul Fouché said the service would be available at selected post offices in all provinces except Mpumalanga and the Western Cape. “The renewal of motor vehicle licences is the most popular transaction at post pffice branches – clear evidence of the success of this service,” he said. Motorists who had received traffic fines could also pay them at any post office countrywide, he added. The South African Post Office said on Tuesday it would now accept debit and credit card payments, in addition to cash, for motor vehicle licence renewals at its branches offering the service. The SA Post Office announced that its group chief executive has tendered his resignation after three and a half years at the helm, last Thursday. Barnes cited differences on a forward strategy in relation to the structure of the SA Post Office group, in particular the location of Postbank. SA Post Office board member and designated spokesperson, Dr Charles Nwaila, said following discussions on Barnes’s resignation with the board, the parties were in agreement on an amicable separation. “The board thanks Barnes for his enormous service to the SA Post Office and the country during his tenure,” said Nwaila. – African News Agency (ANA)

SA Post Office now accepting bank card payments for car licence renewals

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Africa Top10 News

Africa Top10 News

Ebola Cure Closer than We Imagined Scientists are a step closer to being able to cure the deadly Ebola haemorrhagic fever after two experimental drugs showed survival rates of as much as 90% in a clinical trial in Congo. An antibody cocktail called REGN-EB3 developed by Regeneron and a monoclonal antibody called mAb114 – will now be offered to all patients infected with the viral disease in an ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The drugs showed “clearly better” results, according to U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), in a trial of four potential treatments being conducted during the second-largest Ebola outbreak in history, now entering its second year in DRC. The drugs improved survival rates from the disease more than two other treatments being tested – ZMapp, made by Mapp Biopharmaceutical, and Remdesivir, made by Gilead Sciences – and those products will be now dropped, said Anthony Fauci, one of the researchers co-leading the trial.SOURCE: REUTERS AFRICA Africa’s Unbanked Find Another Solution to Tap into Formal Economy Mobile money is the fastest-growing source of income for wireless-network operators like MTN Group Ltd. and Vodafone Group Plc’s Safaricom unit, outpacing data since many Africans don’t have the latest smartphones. The service has become an indispensable part of how Africa’s 1.2 billion people live, from buying funeral cover to borrowing money. The number of registered users in Ghana soared 11-fold between 2013 and 2017, International Monetary Fund data shows. Across the continent in Kenya, where it was pioneered, the value of such transactions amounts to almost half of gross domestic product, according to the World Bank. Sub-Saharan Africa has more mobile-money accounts than anywhere else in the world with about 396 million registered users at the end of 2018, a 14% increase from a year earlier, according to the GSM Association. As it catches on around the world, South Asia saw 29% growth in 2018, and it was 38% for East Asia and the Pacific. SOURCE: AL JAZEERA Leading the Revolution for Cleaner Cooking Methods in African Cities The widespread use of charcoal for cooking in African cities can cause devastating damage to forests up to 300 kilometers away, scientist Sebastia n Rodriguez-Sanchez found while working on energy and agriculture issues in West Africa. So in 2015, he co-founded a business to try to fix the problem by weaning people off charcoal — made by smoldering wood — and onto bottled gas. So far, efforts to introduce cleaner stoves that burn less fuel have been led mainly by aid agencies working in rural parts of Africa and Asia — and have had limited success. For families in the Tanzanian city of Dar es Salaam, where Rodriguez-Sanchez started his business, KopaGas, the $150 cost of a gas stove and canister equals half the average monthly wage, making it hard to afford. As a result, four out of five residents in a city generating 40% of the East African nation’s GDP still depend on a fuel that damages both forests and their health to make daily meals. KopaGas hopes to spur uptake of gas cooking using a pay-as-you-go (PAYG) system it developed. For an upfront fee of 15,000 Tanzanian shillings ($6.50), a household gets a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cooking kit that includes a canister fitted with a smart meter. The gas supply is unlocked by mobile phone payments and the meter monitors consumption, feeding back data via the Internet of Things. KopaGas has signed up 3,500 households for its PAYG service, and supplies another 20,000 with traditional gas bottles. Its services reach about 117,000 people in total, a number it aims to boost to 1 million in Tanzania by the end of 2021.SOURCE: VOA South Africa’s First Restaurant to Focus Exclusively on Insects A South Africa-based company, Gourmet Grubb, produces ice cream made from an insect-based dairy alternative they’ve named EntoMilk. It’s made from Hermetia illucens, the black soldier fly. And since June, they’ve been operating a pop-up food concept in Cape Town called The Insect Experience, where dishes featuring insects are plated with the same care and precision as any gourmet delicacy. The pop-up was originally slated to close by the end of August, but Bessa and her partners now hope to keep it open through the middle of 2020, possibly springing up every few months in new locations. Most of the insects used at The Insect Experience come from South African farms, Bessa said. The only exception are the mopane worms, a southern African delicacy that are sourced from neighboring Zimbabwe. There are more than 1,900 known edible insect species consumed around the world, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Edible insects are incredibly healthy, according to Bessa. They’re high in protein that has the right amino acid profile for human consumption. They’re also high in iron and zinc, high in fiber, and they have a healthy fat profile. SOURCE: CNN Did Zimbabwe Get a Clean Break from Mugabe’s Autocratic Rule and Economic Mismanagement? President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s opponents now fear he is more dangerous than his predecessor. The number of government critics charged with “subverting a constitutional government,” a form of treason, during Mr. Mnangagwa’s 21 months at the helm already outstrips the figure during Mr. Mugabe’s 37 years in office, according to a coalition of 22 Zimbabwean rights watchdogs. Mr. Mnangagwa has been traveling extensively throughout Africa, promoting and developing plans for economic reform. He wants to be seen as a modernizer, and he portrays Zimbabwe as once again “open for business.” He opened a dry port for Zimbabwean trade in Namibia. He has reduced the paperwork needed to open companies, and he loudly seeks foreign investment in the mining, tourism, agricultural and textile industries. But Zimbabwe is suffering from vast shortages of fuel, bank notes, water and electricity. Drivers typically wait three hours for gasoline, and civil servants line up all morning to receive part of their salaries in cash. Half of the capital Harare receives running water only once a week, and electricity blackouts last up to 18 hours a day in many areas. An inflation rate of more than 175 percent has put some food and medicine beyond the reach of middle-class Zimbabweans. Shoppers emerging from a Harare supermarket complained of a sevenfold rise in the price of bread since this time last year. SOURCE: THE NEW YORK TIMES Mozambique MPs Criminalise Digital Snooping Anyone who now gains access to phones, computers or other gadgets belonging to someone else without permission will face up to two years in prison. For those who illegally produce, sell or distribute “non-public information” obtained from such devices without permission, the penalty will be a jail term of up to five years. The law now also stipulates that offenders will in addition be fined at least the equivalent of one year’s minimum salary of about $816. The revision aims to adapt criminal law to the realities of modern communication technologies to give individuals and businesses protection. Less of than half of Mozambique’s 31 million inhabitants have mobile phones. SOURCE: CHANNEL AFRICA Multinationals Fined for Bribing African Officials Israeli billionaire Beny Steinmetz and two associates are to stand trial for allegedly bribing Guinean officials to win mining licences. The trio allegedly paid $10m to one of the wives of former Guinean President Lansana Conte. Mr Steinmetz and his mining company Beny Steinmetz Group Resources (BSGR) have previously denied any wrongdoing. The prosecution is seeking prison terms of two to 10 years. The prosecutors, who opened an investigation into the alleged bribery six years ago, allege that Mr Steinmetz obtained the mining rights in the Simandou region of south-eastern Guinea just before Conte died in 2008. They charge that the money was paid to a wife of the country’s former president partially through Swiss bank accounts. In February this year, Guinean authorities dropped corruption charges against Mr Steinmetz and BSGR in exchange for relinquishing rights to the Simandou mine. SOURCE: BBC The New Crop Keeping Kenyan Farmers Afloat As drought and erratic weather wreak havoc across rural Kenya, a growing number of farmers are abandoning traditional crops such as maize and rice for the more lucrative muguka, a potent legal stimulant that relieves fatigue. A variety of khat, which produces a mild high when chewed, muguka is fast-growing, making it less vulnerable to large swings in weather conditions, and uses about half as much water as maize. But it is bad news for food supplies, said agriculture experts and local politicians, who warned of a potential food crop shortage as farmers clear their fields of staples to make way for muguka. There is no official record of how many farmers have switched from growing food crops to muguka, said Mwangi. Nor is there data on how much land is being used for muguka, according to Kenya’s Agriculture and Food Authority (AFA). But Francis Kimori, chair of the Mbeere Muguka Farmers Sacco, a savings and credit co-operative, estimated that four out of every five households around the Mount Kenya region, including in Embu County, are farming the stimulant in some quantity.SOURCE: BUSINESS DAY LIVE Pulling South Africa into the Electric Car Era Nissan Motor Co., BMW AG and Volkswagen AG are among carmakers in talks to bring the electric-car revolution to South Africa, as the nation’s auto-factory floors risk being left behind in the global switch to greener vehicles. The industry is preparing a unified stance on electrification to present to the government by the end of the year, according to Mike Mabasa, chief executive officer of the National Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africa. Among the goals is persuading lawmakers to reduce or drop a 23% import tariff on electric vehicles to help ramp up nascent domestic sales, he said. Another is to roll out a charging infrastructure in a country where the state-owned power monopoly is in deep financial crisis. To date, there are no firm plans for electric-car or hybrid production in South Africa, but the government and industry agreed in 2018 to extend a manufacturing incentive program, creating jobs and enabling models like the BMW X3 sport utility vehicle and Nissan’s Novara pickup to be produced locally. [LISTEN] How Our African Ancestors Made Sound In The Stone Age The Middle and Later Stone Age, which lasted from about 300 000 to 300 years ago in South Africa, was an important time for the African continent. During this period humans developed many different strategies to produce a variety of stone tools. They used fire as an engineering tool and to cook. As expert hunter gatherers, they successfully inhabited many parts of Africa. But one thing that’s been missing from our understanding of this epoch is sound, noise or music. There’s been very little research on the role of sound production during the Stone Age. That’s very surprising since we know that the latter part of this period was an important one for the development of complex cognition, symbolic expression and social dynamics among human ancestors. So it stands to reason that groups which were communicating in complex ways might also explore sound for expression. One reason to account for this lack of research may be that sound-producing instruments are usually made of organic materials which typically don’t survive well, archaeologically. SOURCE: AFRICA.COM

Africa Top10 News